Friday, December 15, 2023

In 2023, we experimented with artificial intelligence and were uncertain about how to proceed

 


Advances in AI like ChatGPT sparked excitement in 2023, but there were also concerns about how they would affect jobs, media, and security. The hype led to attempts at regulation.

In 2023, artificial intelligence became widely used; however, the technology still has a long way to go before it can fulfill people's science fiction fantasies of machines that are like humans.

ChatGPT was the catalyst for a year of AI acclaim. Even though not everyone understood exactly how the chatbot worked or what it could be used for, it gave the world a glimpse of the most recent developments in computer science.

Fei-Fei Li, a pioneering AI scientist, stated, "I would call this an inflection moment." It is hoped that 2023 will be remembered in history for the profound technological shifts and public awakening. Additionally, it demonstrates how messy this technology is.

She stated that it took people a year to determine "what this is, how to use it, what the impact — all the good, the bad, and the ugly."

Panic over AI Soon after New Year's Day, classrooms reopened and schools from Seattle to Paris began blocking ChatGPT, triggering the first AI panic of 2023. The chatbot, which was released in late 2022, was already getting requests from teenagers to write essays and take home tests.

After "learning" the patterns of a huge collection of human-written works, the AI large language models behind technology like ChatGPT work by guessing the next word in a sentence over and over again. They frequently misunderstand realities. But the results seemed so natural that it made people curious about the next AI developments and how they might be used for deception and trickery.

As this new group of generative AI tools threatened the livelihoods of those who write, draw, strum, or code for a living by producing novel images, music, and synthetic voices in addition to words, concerns grew. It fueled strikes by Hollywood actors and writers as well as legal challenges from bestselling authors and visual artists.

A portion of the man-made intelligence field's most regarded researchers cautioned that the innovation's uncontrolled advancement was walking toward outmaneuvering people and potentially undermining their reality, while different researchers called their interests exaggerated or focused on additional impending dangers.

By the spring, AI-generated deepfakes had entered U.S. election campaigns, some of which were more convincing than others. One falsely depicted Donald Trump embracing the nation's former top infectious disease expert. In Ukraine and Gaza, the technology made it harder and harder to tell the difference between real and fake war footage.

By the end of the year, the AI crises had moved on to ChatGPT's own maker, the San Francisco startup OpenAI, which was almost destroyed by corporate turmoil over its charismatic CEO. Additionally, they had moved on to a government meeting room in Belgium, where exhausted political leaders from across the European Union emerged with a deal for the first major AI legal safeguards in the world after days of intense negotiations.

The new simulated intelligence regulation won't produce results until 2025, and other lawmaking bodies — including the U.S. Congress — are still far from establishing their own.

Too much hype?

There is no doubt that the commercial AI products that were presented in 2023 incorporated technological advancements that were not feasible during earlier stages of AI research, which date back to the middle of the twentieth century.

However, according to Gartner, a market research company that has been following what it refers to as the "hype cycle" of emerging technologies since the 1990s, the most recent generative AI trend is at its peak of hype. Imagine a wooden roller coaster speeding up to its highest hill and about to plunge into what Gartner calls a "trough of disillusionment" before gliding back into the real world.

"Generative simulated intelligence is directly in the pinnacle of swelled assumptions," Gartner expert Dave Micko said. " Vendors and manufacturers of generative AI make a lot of claims about its capabilities and its ability to deliver those capabilities.

However, according to Gartner, a market research company that has been following what it refers to as the "hype cycle" of emerging technologies since the 1990s, the most recent generative AI trend is at its peak of hype. Imagine a wooden roller coaster speeding up to its highest hill and about to plunge into what Gartner calls a "trough of disillusionment" before gliding back into the real world.

Gartner analyst Dave Micko stated, "Generative AI is right in the peak of inflated expectations." Vendors and manufacturers of generative AI make a lot of claims about its capabilities and its ability to deliver those capabilities.

This month, Google was criticized for editing a video showing off its most powerful AI model, Gemini, in a way that made it look more impressive and human-like.

According to Micko, prominent AI developers are pushing particular methods of utilizing the most recent technology, the majority of which correspond to their current product line, which includes software for workplace productivity or search engines. That doesn't imply that is the way the world will utilize it.

He stated, "I think adoption actually comes from the bottom up," despite the fact that "Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Apple would love us to adopt the way that they think about their technology and that they deliver that technology."

Is this time different?

It's easy to overlook the fact that AI commercialization is not new. PC vision strategies created by Li and different researchers helped sort through an immense data set of photographs to perceive items and individual faces and assist with directing self-driving vehicles. Advances in speech recognition have made voice assistants like Siri and Alexa commonplace in the lives of many people.

Tom Gruber, co-founder of Siri Inc., which Apple acquired and made an integral part of the iPhone, stated, "When we launched Siri in 2011, it was at that point the fastest-growing consumer app and the only major mainstream application of AI that people had ever experienced."

However, Gruber believes that what is taking place right now is the "biggest wave ever" in AI, opening up new opportunities as well as posing new risks.

Gruber stated, "We're surprised that we could accidentally encounter this amazing language ability, by training a machine to play solitaire on the entire internet." It's pretty amazing.

The perils could come quick in 2024, as significant public decisions in the U.S., India and somewhere else could get overflowed with simulated intelligence created deepfakes.

A digital assistant's vision could be enhanced in the long run by AI technology's rapidly improving language, visual perception, and step-by-step planning capabilities, but only if access is granted to the "inner loop of our digital life stream," Gruber stated.

They are able to keep you focused, as in, "You should watch this video." This book should be read by you. You ought to answer this individual's correspondence,'" Gruber said. " A real executive assistant does that. We could have that, but there is a significant risk to privacy and personal information.

Catch Daily Highlights In Your Email

* indicates required

Post Top Ad